How do you answer a literature question?

How do you answer a literature question?

Therefore, to successfully respond to literature questions, the following things should be taken into consideration at least as the first step to start with:

  1. a) Read the question carefully.
  2. b) Paraphrase the question.
  3. c) Pay attention to key words in the question.
  4. d) Write an outline of your answer.

How do you revise a poem?

13 Ways to Revise a Poem

  1. Double the poem. My writing game completely changed when I started to do this.
  2. Move the end to the beginning.
  3. Highlight the best lines.
  4. Create word clusters.
  5. Transfer it into couplets.
  6. Memorize your draft.
  7. Change modes (pen, computer, etc.).
  8. Experiment with verbs.

How do you answer a poetry question in English literature?

Don’t repeat the question. Show that you understand the meaning of the question and indicate how you will answer it. If comparing poems, make it clear which ones you are writing about. Paragraphs covering: themes/ideas/attitudes, form and structure, rhythm, rhyme, language and contexts (if it’s a part of the question).

How are Ozymandias and London similar?

Both poems show the relationship and power conflict between man and nature in different stages, ‘Ozymandias’ shows the consumption of human creations by nature and ‘London’ shows futile attempts by humans to assert power over nature; the clear similarity in both of these is that, despite everything, nature will always …

What’s the theme of the poem Ozymandias?

The major theme behind “Ozymandias” is that all power is temporary, no matter how prideful or tyrannical a ruler is. Ramesses II was one of the ancient world’s most powerful rulers.

What is the summary of the poem Ozymandias?

Shelley’s poem “Ozymandias” famously describes a ruined statue of an ancient king in an empty desert. Although the king’s statue boastfully commands onlookers to “Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair,” there are no works left to examine: the king’s cities, empire, and power have all disappeared over time.

What is a unseen poem?

An unseen text is one that you won’t have seen or studied until you open the examination paper. The other unseen texts you will be tested on are in the English language papers, so this isn’t new.

Who was the real life Ozymandias?

Ramesses II

Is Ozymandias real?

Many people are familiar with the name Ozymandias through the famous poem “Ozymandias,” written in 1818 by the English Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (lived 1792 – 1822), but not everyone is aware that Ozymandias was actually a real ancient Egyptian pharaoh.

How is nature presented in Ozymandias?

The effects are different in the poems because in ‘Ozymandias’ nature is represented by the desert and how it wears away and destroys the statue of the once mighty pharaoh over time, whereas nature is symbolised through the sea and storm in ‘Storm on the Island’ and how its power can cause fear in the islanders.

Why is breaking bad called Ozymandias?

The episode title refers to the poem “Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley, which recounts the crumbling legacy of a once-proud king. Bryan Cranston recited the entire poem in a 2013 trailer for the series. Walley-Beckett had wanted to use the poem for a long time and thus introduced it to showrunner Vince Gilligan.

What kind of person is Ozymandias?

Ozymandias was a king who loved himself more than his subjects. He was a self-absorbed megalomaniac with the notion of being the mightiest ruler in the whole world. Insensitive and haughty in temperament, he was self-obsessed and arrogant.

What is the purpose of revising the poem?

“Re-vision” means to look at your work with a “new vision” or “new eyes.” It’s not about fixing spelling mistakes or making it grammatically perfect. Instead, revision helps you take the idea of your poem and make it more vivid, clear, interesting, and powerful. So let’s go revise!

Is the Ozymandias statue real?

Archaeologists from Egypt and Germany have found an eight-metre (26ft) statue submerged in groundwater in a Cairo slum that they say probably depicts revered Pharaoh Ramses II, who ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago.

What is the irony in Ozymandias?

The irony is situational. The point of the statue is to emphasize the greatness of the Pharaoh and the way his works and his fame, like the stone of the statue, will endure forever. That expectation is reflected in the inscription: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!

What Ozymandias means?

A very ominous poem. Although the name Ozymandias (which means “a tyrant, a dictator, a megalomaniac; someone or something of immense size, a colossus”) has Greek roots and dates back to roughly 323 BC, Percy Bysshe Shelley brought the word to prominence in 1818 after publishing a sonnet by the same name.

What is Ozymandias a symbol of?

The Statue of Ozymandias In Shelley’s work, the statue of the ancient Egyptian pharaoh Ramses II, or Ozymandias, symbolizes political tyranny.

Where was Ozymandias found?

The 26ft statue, which was submerged in groundwater in the Egypt capital, was found by joint expedition of Egyptian and German archaeologists near the ruins of Ramses II’s temple in the ancient city of Heliopolis, located in the eastern part of modern-day Cairo, according to The Guardian.

What poem is similar to Ozymandias?

Ozymandias is in sonnet form, while Tissue uses 10 stanzas. Shelley uses iambic pentameter throughout, whereas Dharker’s poem has varied rhythm and shorter lines. Ozymandias is more narrative in style, while Dharker layers up images.

What is the main message of Ozymandias?

Overall, the message of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s “Ozymandias” is in the idea that power is temporary, even that of great rulers who may believe their power to be immortal.

How does the poem Ozymandias show power?

Ozymandias’ power is presented as being dictatorial and cruel- this is clear in the description of his statue’s facial expression- “sneer of cold command” and implied through the inscription which appears on the statue’s pedestal: “king of kings: Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!” in which Ozymandias …