How does the authors choice of Hungry?

How does the authors choice of Hungry?

By conveying that idea, authors show us how brutally the slaves had to work. By saying that the mills were hungry, authors create this monster-like image of a creature whose need is imperative. And the slaves were the ones who were supposed to care for that need in a most unjust and painful manner.

How does the use of the word machine support the authors claim in this passage?

How does the use of the word machine support the authors’ claim in this passage? Its negative connotation indicates that enslaved people had to work like robots instead of human beings.

How do the authors create a tone that develops their claim and purpose?

How do the authors support their claim and purpose with their choice of words? How do the authors create a tone that develops their claim and purpose? by using words with negative connotations, such as brutal. How does the authors’ choice of hungry to describe the mills best support the claim?

How do authors use historical evidence to support their claim?

How do the authors use historical evidence to support their claim in this passage? They use primary-source quotations to show that enslaved people in Saint Domingue were willing to destroy property to gain their freedom. You just studied 10 terms!

Which evidence best supports the author’s claim and purpose?

Thus, the text evidence that best supports the authors’ claim and purpose is how “the enslaved Africans’ ability to speak” presents them as human and changed the “Age of Sugar” to an “Age of Freedom”.

How does the illustration help the reader understand the text?

How does the illustration help the reader understand the text? The illustration helps the reader recognize how teams cut and bundled sugar cane. The illustration helps the reader determine why sugar cane had to be cut so quickly. The illustration helps the reader observe the hot weather on sugar plantations.

How do authors support their claim and purpose with their choice of words?

How do the authors support their claim and purpose with word choice? by using imagery that appeals to the sense of sound. by including words with mostly positive connotations. by using descriptive words that entertain readers.

How would you describe word choice?

Diction refers to a writer’s purposeful word choice. Along with syntax, diction can be used to create tone and imagery in creative writing. Think about your writing’s purpose and the message you want to convey.

How does the author’s overall word choice in the reading support her perspective?

How does the author’s overall word choice in the reading support her perspective? The author chooses words with positive connotations to describe the gifts of women writers, and negative words to discuss the lack of opportunities and rights for women.

What is the central idea of sugar by Anup Shah?

Which text evidence supports the authors claim?

Explanation: The given text is taken from the passage Sugar Changed the World. This text evidence best supports the authors’ claim that a frantic pace made working conditions even worse. The owner of the mill made sure that no matter what grinding must continue during work hours.

What is the central idea of sugar changed the world?

The central idea of the text is that sugar had a positive and negative impact on the world. The central idea of the text is that there are many “hidden costs” in the impact of the sugar industry.

Which claim do both passages support new technology in the sugar?

Explanation: In the ending serfdom worldwide economic demand for sugar takes the place as one of the most important factors that caused it. In both passages, we can see how important economic demand for sugar was for it and they are both highlighting it in the passages and because of that I this answer is correct one.

What is the most important claim that the authors make in Part Four back to our stories?

Sugar production and trade had a global impact on slavery and rebellion. This is the most important claim that the authors make in “Part Four: Back to Our Stories: New Workers, New Sugar” in Sugar Changed the World.

Which claim do both passages support?

How do the authors develop the claim in the two passages? Both passages support the claim that human rights became more important than property rights in the early 1800s.

How does the evidence support the central idea that cane sugar?

How does the evidence support the central idea that cane sugar helped lead to the abolition of slavery? The evidence explains that modern technology triggered the shift from cane sugar to beet sugar. Sugar was the connection, the tie, between slavery and freedom.

Which claim do both passages support sugar?

Both passages use evidence to develop the claim that Eastern European farmers and enslaved people on sugar plantations shared a common goal. Both passages use evidence to show that knowledge of the extreme brutality of the sugar trade changed viewpoints about enslavement.